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Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)
engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)

engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

(Source: paintingses, via meninroad)

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Here’s my post on the Voyager fantasy fiction blog about sword fighting traditions, and whether a real sword fight was more your Princess Bride or your Game of Thrones kinda thing.

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art-of-swords:

European Smallsword

  • Dated: 17th century
  • Culture: English
  • Measurements: overall length 97cm, hilt length 16.5cm

The handle of the sword is composed of a wooden grip bound in copper and brass wire binding. The hilt is made of iron and features a knuckle guard, side ring and an oval shaped pommel. The blade is double edge blade of hexagonal section and has a single fuller on either side.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Antiques Armoury

See, I think this is beautiful - so elegant, not all fussy like so many of the court swords with all that gilt.

This is simple, glorious lines, and it looks like it would balance well in the hand.

I can imagine Julie using this.

Damn, I can imagine myself using this.

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aidiosacademia:

You think I’m not a  g o d d e s s ?

These are all great, but Athena is spot on. Yes.

And the tradition continues…

(Source: arryns)

Tags: Goddess
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theancientworld:

Statue of Venus
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

theancientworld:

Statue of Venus

Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

(via aidiosacademia)

Tags: Goddess
Photoset

art-of-swords:

Frantopino Small-sword

  • Dated: early 18th century
  • Culture: French
  • Measurements: overall length 100 cm

The sword has a straight blade of triangular section, with hollow faces, wider at the first part, engraved with motto "ne me tirez pas sans Raisons" on a side, “ne me remettez point sans honneur” on the other, both among woven bands.

The beautiful, iron hilt is richly chiselled with mythical figures, deities, spirals and floral motifs on gilt ground. The wooden grip features silver wire binding, bands and a moor’s heads.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

Stunning. Contemporary weapon just like those Julie and d’Albert used in Goddess.

I had to decide early on the fencing tradition and weapons they were most likely to have studied. I decided on smallsword, although they could equally have been rapier experts at this point in history, as it was a time of transition in fencing technique. Smallsword may be less flashy, but it is very precise and the focus is on the duel.

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alkonoststorm:

Are there any movies/etc based on La Maupin’s life? I just feel like this needs to be a thing.

Hell yeah!

Link

Another biography for those who just can’t get enough of Julie’s exploits.

(Source: mydragonhoard)

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Julie d’Aubigny: Princess of the Opera (1670-1707)

rejectedprincesses:

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This week we turn our attention to La Maupin, Julie d’Aubigny: sword-slinger, opera singer, and larger-than-life bisexual celebrity of 17th century France. Her life was a whirlwind of duels, seduction, graverobbing, and convent-burning so intense that she had to be pardoned by the king of France TWICE. Read on for more.

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Fabulous new artwork - this time of the convent incident - from the wonderful Rejected Princesses.